Testimonials

Testimonials

 

Cenacle Consultants LLC

Liturgical Consultants

Our mission is to integrate sacred art into our lifelong faith journey:

Living in relationship with the Body of Christ.

 

Cenacle, also known as the Upper Room, is a term used for the site of the Last Supper. The word is a derivative of the Latin word for cena, which means dinner.

Services

 

  • Liturgical Consulting

  • Churches, hospitals, schools

  • Artisan Consulting and Procurement

  • Church Supplies

  • Pectoral Crosses for EM’s

  • Life-size Bronze Casting

  • Stained Glass Windows

  • Processional Crosses

  • Crosiers

  • Altars

  • Chairs

  • Tabernacles

  • Candle Holders

  • Design Pendants

  • Lighting Consultation

  • Sound System Consultation

  • Restoration & Renovation Services

 


 
Finance Consultancy

Audit & Review Management

RETAIN OBJECTIVE, SEASONED EXPERTS TO ASSIST OR MANAGE CRITICAL COMPLIANCE PROCESSES SUCH AS RECERTIFICATION, ANNUAL AUDIT PREPARATION, PROGRAM REVIEW RESPONSES

DATA ACCUMULATION AND REPORTING

  • FULFILL DATA REQUESTS FROM REGULATORY AGENCIES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IN A FORMAT THAT TELLS YOUR STORY

  • CREATE CENTRAL DATA REPOSITORIES THAT COMBINE OPERATIONAL, EDUCATIONAL AND FINANCIAL ELEMENTS TO ENHANCE EXECUTIVE DECISION MAKING

  • CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT – FROM RESEARCH TO CERTIFICATION

  • AUDIT AND REVIEW MANAGEMENT – RECERTIFICATION, ANNUAL AUDIT PREPARATION, PROGRAM REVIEW RESPONSES

  • DATA ACCUMULATION AND REPORTING – FULFILLMENT OF DATA REQUESTS FROM REGULATORY AGENCIES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

  • INVESTOR DUE DILIGENCE – EXTENSIVE INVESTIGATIVE REVIEW OF POTENTIAL INVESTMENTS IN THE HIGHER EDUCATION ARENA

  • BOARD AND INVESTOR-REQUESTED ASSESSMENT – INTERNAL REVIEWS FROM AN OBJECTIVE PERSPECTIVE

Discussing the Numbers

INVESTOR DUE DILIGENCE

EXTENSIVE INVESTIGATIVE REVIEW OF POTENTIAL INVESTMENTS IN THE HIGHER EDUCATION ARENA, PROVIDING BOTH TRADITIONAL ANALYSES AS WELL AS OUT-OF-THE-BOX QUALITATIVE ELEMENTS THAT DIFFERENTIATE EXCEPTIONAL VS AVERAGE OPPORTUNITIES

BOARD AND INVESTOR-REQUESTED ASSESSMENT

INTERNAL REVIEWS FROM AN OBJECTIVE PERSPECTIVE HELPS ENSURE TEAMS ARE MEETING THE EVER CHANGING NEEDS AND DEMANDS OF THE ORGANIZATION. ASSESSMENTS INCLUDE WRITTEN REPORT RECAPPING CURRENT STATE OF AFFAIRS, SWOT ANALYSES, AND RECOMMENDATIONS TO ADVANCE INSTITUTIONAL SUCCESS

Why Liturgical Consulting

 

 

From Built of Living Stones, Art, Architecture and Worship – Committee on Divine Worship, USCCB:

The Liturgical Consultants
 

§ 199 § The construction of a church building cannot be undertaken without proper professionals in a variety of fields. When a parish begins to undertake the building or renovation of a liturgical space, the parish building committee should obtain the services of specialists in liturgical design. lt is the responsibility of the liturgical consultant to assist the pastor, the staff, and the entire parish with continuing education about the importance, role, and value of worship, and the impact of the church building upon worship.

 

§ 200 § The liturgical consultant also works with the architect. Some architects are liturgical architects. They possess, in addition to their architectural credentials, artistic insights and formal liturgical education that equip them to engage in liturgical design. However, this is not always the case. The liturgical consultant(s) selected by the parish work with the architect and other members of the design team from the earliest stages of the process to help them apply the principles and norms of liturgical design to the practical and liturgical needs of the parish being served. This includes an examination of the acoustics, the flow and movement for processions, appropriate styles for liturgical celebrations, the interrelationships within the Eucharist as well as the relationship of the Eucharist with the other sacraments, and all the elements required by the Church’s liturgy. In addition, the consultant may have expertise in design and can help to coordinate the design and fabrication of appropriate furniture and other objects to be used during liturgical services, as well as the liturgical art to be placed within the church.
§ 141 § Throughout the history of the Church, a dynamic tension has existed between the continuity of traditional artistic expression and the need to articulate the faith in ways proper to each age and to diverse cultures. In every age the Church has attempted to engage the best contemporary artists and architects to design places of worship that have sheltered the assembly and disclosed the presence of the living God. In the past, dialogue between the Church and the artist has yielded a marriage of faith and art, producing sublime places of prayer, buildings of awe-inspiring, transcendent beauty, and humble places of worship that, in their simplicity, inspire a sense of the sacred.

§ 149 § Worthy art is an essential, integral element in the sacred beauty of a church building. Through skilled use of proportion, shape, color, and design, art unifies and helps to integrate the place of worship with the actions of worship. Artistic creations in the place of worship inspire contemplation and devotion. Sculpture, furnishings, art-glass, vesture, paintings, bells, organs, and other musical instruments as well as windows, doors, and every visible and tactile detail of architecture possess the potential to express the wholeness, harmony, and radiance of profound beauty.
For those of you that have traveled to Europe and visited the numerous cathedrals, consider the art. What if substandard art were used in those cathedrals? It was and is the belief that sacred art enhances our holy spaces and should last many lifetimes. We are not building God’s Kingdom for the here and now, but for all time.

We can help you design and integrate sacred art that will be an enduring testament to your space. We are committed to creating an environment that reflects the rich history and traditions of our faith yet brings the “essence” of your community into the design to create a memorable, respectful and permanent space.

Catechesis of the Crosses

Advent Season
 

Shoot of Jesse Cross

 

This cross tells the Story of God in the Old Testament, and to connect the Advent Season with the faithfulness of God across 4,000 years of history. The Branch is a biblical sign of newness out of discouragement, which became a way to talk about the expected messiah (for example, Jer 23:5). It is therefore an appropriate symbol of Jesus the Christ, who is the revelation of the grace and faithfulness of God.

We begin in December, which is our time for expressing hope and strengthening the dreams that will carry us through the next year.
Our tradition tells us that Advent has a twofold character: First, as a season to prepare us for Christmas, when Christ’s first coming is remembered, and secondly, as a season when that remembrance directs our minds and hearts to await Christ’s coming again at the end of time. Advent is thus a bridge between the past experiences with Christ and those to come, a period of devout and joyful expectation.

 

 

Christmas Season
 

Light of Christ Cross

 

John 1:1-18

“What came to be through him was life, and this life was the light of the human race; the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.”

Next to the yearly celebration of the paschal mystery [meaning the Triduum and Easter season], the Church holds most sacred the memorial of Christ’s birth and early manifestations.
More than Jesus’ birthday, the Christmas season, beginning with Christmas Day and extending until the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, is a time for reveling and remembering in the nativity of Christ, his revelation to the Jewish shepherds, Christ’s revelation to the gentile magi (that’s us!), Christ’s baptism by John in the Jordan, and his changing water into wine at the wedding feast of Cana. In all these saving events, we know that “the Word was made flesh and dwelt among us.”

 

 

 

Ordinary Time
 

Tree of Life Cross
 

 

Revelations Chapter 2:7
“Whoever has ears ought to hear what the Spirit says to the churches. To the victor I will give the right to eat from the tree of life that is in the garden of God.”

The Ordinary in Ordinary Time refers to ordinal—counted or numbered—time, not a lack of something to celebrate. Apart from those seasons having their own distinctive character [Advent, Christmastime, Lent, Triduum and Easter time], the 33 or 34 weeks that remain in the yearly cycle that do not celebrate a specific aspect of the mystery of Christ. Rather, especially on Sundays, they are devoted to the mystery of Christ in all its aspects.
There are two blocks of Ordinary Time, one in winter between Christmas and Lent, and the second in summer and fall. During both these periods, we walk as companions on the journey with our fellow disciples, thankfully “counting” those ordinary rhythms in extraordinary ways.

 

 

 

Lent

 

Cross of Nails
 

Since the Second Vatican Council, the Church has reemphasized the baptismal character of Lent with the restoration of the catechumenate, a period of learning and discernment for individuals who have declared their desire to become Catholics.
Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of the Season of Lent. It is a season of penance, reflection, and fasting which prepares us for Christ’s Resurrection on Easter Sunday, through which we attain redemption.
While the ashes symbolize penance and contrition, they are also a reminder that God is gracious and merciful to those who call on Him with repentant hearts. His Divine mercy is of utmost importance during the season of Lent, and the Church calls on us to seek that mercy during the entire Lenten season with reflection, prayer and penance.

Lent is traditionally a time of fasting, prayer and almsgiving.
Fasting, more than a time to eat less and give up sweets; it is a time for spiritual fasting. Giving up temporal things and focusing on a spiritual life is much more important. Spending time with God rather than the TV should be the focus.

Prayer is key to your Lenten ritual. Personal and family prayer can lead to a fulfilling relationship with God and is the first step in developing your personal relationship with God.
Almsgiving or charity is the final step of our Lenten practice. Here, being an active participant in good works sets us on the path of being a strong steward of our catholic social teaching.

 
 

Bio

Featured Artists

Cecilia Blomberg

St. Joseph of Cupertino

St. Francis

Joseph the Worker

Joan of Arc

St. Cecilia

St. Michael the Archangel

St. Thomas Aquinas

St. Ignatius

Tapestries Hanging in the U.S. Air Force Academy

 
 

Contact Me

Cenacle Consultants LLC

Bill Sarge

Email: sarge@cenacleconsultants.com